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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
is on the path to defeat. >> we decimated the leaders. >> on the path to defeat and osama bin laden is dead. >> we decimated al qaeda central, eliminated osama bin laden. >> al qaeda is much weaker than it was when i came into office. >> osama bin laden is dead, and general motors as a live. >> the war in afghanistan is coming to a close. al qaeda is on the path to the feet. osama bin laden is dead. >> today the core of al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan is on the path of the feet. the remaining operators spend more time thinking about their own safety and plotting against us. lou: joining us now, radio talk-show host, fox news contributor, former reagan political director, fox is political analyst. thank you both for being here. a defeat for al qaeda, and today we are watching the united states close 19 of our facilities in the middle east and north africa. your reaction? >> my reaction is that the president obviously did what he thought he had to to get reelected instead of talking in terms of an ongoing threat. he made some progress, but it's an ongoing threat that will be the the rest
and communication security of osama bin laden is, he would not be online in direct communication. he shows up at various points. there is a suggestion that he was indeed in the conversation. people have asked us, why would you report all these details? our sources have made it clear that when the leader who reported the communications -- it was enough information for al qaeda to walk back the cat. we left out some details from our initial report. believe,oint, we especially since our sources were giving us this information, that it was important to explain the current context of threats. point, i think it is a tough one. cannot argue with the fact that u.s. special operations forces in 2011 found osama bin laden and killed him. that was a huge blow to the organization. that, years leading up to a lot of analysts believe that bin laden was out of touch. they figured he did not play a day-to-day role. the organization has devolved into affiliates. one of the stories i remember writing after the raid -- bin laden played an important role in terms of managing this organization with these various
you continuously say that osama bin laden was dead and al qaeda was on the run when in fact now you've closed more embassies than ever before in u.s. history because of terrorism? that's not exactly the question he got last night. >>steve: the extraordinary thing is given all the news these days, the first time we've heard from the president of the united states in a live tv environment asked questions of him was by jay leno. clearly the president, he selected the softball venues because they worked in the past. entertainment tonight, people magazine, got some criticism from the mainstream media but that's only because he wouldn't talk to them. he knew he had to go directly to the low-information voter on shows like this. while president is out banging his campaign for the economy, he went right to jay leno and he painted a picture where things are getting better and my policies, they're working. >> the economy is growing. the unemployment rate has been ticking down. and housing is improving. we've seen the deficit cut in half. health care costs are actually going up slower than the
on terror continues whether osama bin wanted is dead does not mean alaeda is dead be cleared out 20 embassies around the world to move this tax out by the way we cannot say evacuate. it was the ordey departure th know what is going on and they are getting troubled by the fact that the lexicon has reached every part of the administration whether iras iras, defense department, war on terror, they will call it their own dictionary sll believe we should move the white house to california since we hear national security on jay leno give me a break hcannot talk to the press corps but he ss down with jay leno? lou: that the term radical islamist should not be used or the war on terror or the overseas contingency operation. thlist goes on and on and to talk with jay leno i am sure you both notice he did as a radical islamist but violent radical extremist and vient extremist and did not even refer to a terrorist or radical is law because frankly this administration does not have the intellectuals or individual courage to speak graham -- played the to the american people to t enemies are and
on the people who actually attacked us on 9/11. today al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> there are reports, too, the leader who replaced osama bin laden has given two speeches saying the muslim world needs to unite, said he disagrees with the u.s. policy going on in egypt as well. also, this is the 27th day of ramadan, also known as the night of power, the time when moham d mohammed -- if you're a believer, when mohammed got the first versus for the koran. >> the massive prison brakes across the region. >> not everybody believes al qaeda is on the run. >> apparently al qaeda doesn't agree. they strung more than 1,000 people from prisons in various countries. >> last week. >> 1200 prisoners in a single break. >> benghazi. >> how do you do that? >> a massive one at abu ghraib prison in iraq, too. here is the general on the al qaeda threat that we face. >>. >> certainly after 9/11 we clearly had al qaeda on the run because we responded to quickly to that threat and intercepted a lot of other threats and killed a bunch of leaders in the process. they have had time to reg
was all but left for dead? >> today al qaeda is on its heels and osama bin laden is dead. >> from the attack on the u.s. embassy in benghazi, libya, to the armed takeover of a gas facility in algeria that killed three americans. >> after benghazi, these al qaeda types are really on steroids thinking we're weaker and they're stronger. >> plus those jail breaks in the last few weeks, followed by this unprecedented closing of two dozen diplomatic posts and an interpol alert, dire warnings being issued on capitol hill. >> this is your wake-up call. al qaeda is in many ways stronger than before 9/11. >> and nowhere is the bomb making threat of al qaeda more on display than in yemen. >> there are indications in the last week or two that the head of al qaeda's war in pakistan has appointed nasir al wahayshi has his head man. >> so does this indicate al qaeda is in an surge snns -- insurgence? gentlemen, thank you so much for being here. what do you think of this news that zawahri has handed over the number two position. >> it's amazing that he would outsource operations to someone thousa
embassies this remains a very active plot led by osama bin laden's former personal secretary. across the mideast, u.s. embassies look like siege points. in yemen heavily armed local troops ring the american compound, manning security check points and patting down passers-by. from western africa to bangladesh, a 7,000-mile security belt was pulled tight. leaving 22 u.s. embassies and consulates dark and empty. >> there is a significant threat stream and we're reacting to it. >> reporter: u.s. intelligence intercepted al qaeda communications about an attack on strategically significant american interests. but the exact target remains unclear. >> we have received information that high level people from al qaeda in arabian peninsula are talking about a major attack. >> reporter: one official told abc news the part that is alarming is the confidence they show while communicating and air of certainty. one major worry explosives placed inside suicide bombers. we're concerned about surgically implanted devices. the official said. these are guys who have developed the techniques to defeat our
that jihadists have used to their advantage. yemen, the ancestral home of osama bin laden has become the base of al qaeda. eight years later the terrorist organization targeted the u.s. embassy in the yemeni capitol killing one american. in 2011 robert worth wrote an article in "the new york times." it was titled "yemen on the brink of hell." yemen is a source of leverage for weakened regimes. quote, terrorism helps raise the profile of a country that had long been neglected. as one yemeni official put it to me, yemen used to be called the tail of the saudi cow. now it is its own cow. former president alley abdullah saleh seemed to view al qaeda as a bargaining chip. he paroled convicted terrorists or allowed them to escape from prison, even as he cracked down on the peaceful protestors. i have two analysts joining me. in terms of being a partner, if you will, on the war on terror, can the yemeni redress it? as you pointed out, having al qaeda in their backyard has almost been a point of leverage with the west and we see what the sewing of those seas have brought in yemen today. >> that's tru
is never going to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [ cheers ] >> because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. >> over overnight in yemen which is on high alert the u.s. conducted its sixth punishing drone strike in ten days. the yemeni government said six suspected al qaeda members were killed. 29 suspected al qaeda terrorists have been taken out by u.s. drones in the past ten days. new throats from al qaeda forced the evacuation of the u.s. embassy in yemen. among those outposts shut down through at least saturday by terror concerns. i wan
of building seven. now that osama bin laden is dead and 911 is a decade behind us and more, i think a good argument can be made that the documents that the federal government has regarding the 911 attacks should be declassified and the truth will come out. host: you have to distinguish between those two things. bradley manning did leave an awful lot of classified information. evidently, it went to wikileaks and i think the court was correct in deciding it was not guilty of aiding the enemy because he had not directed that information to the enemy and that is what the statute says. that is how military justice rules agreed. with regard to the rest of it, i think it is clear that he did, in fact, leaked confidential information that was classified and therefore, he got punished. many people do great things sometimes get punished for them. i think back to the civil-rights era and help congressman john lewis was punished over and over again for acts of courage. this countryrs because the security system, the intelligence community and the military defense complex, military-industrial complex h
but the country's capacity for self-inflself-infl icted damage must have astounded even osama bin laden and he points out there is always a nightmare for example of acquiring, terrorists acquiring weapons of mass distraction but nothing would give the terrorists and a greater satisfaction than we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict their lives and liberties accordingly. >> guest: i think this is always a difficult debate. i think if we step back and look at it since 9/11 the united states even though we are one of the most open and free countries has remained frankly open and free. we have continued to have super bowls and have continued to have people travel abroad. we have robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action i would use the analogy is like a hurricane. we have weather forecast that says there is going to be a storm and we are battening down the hatches and if you live in these places as the storm passes , great but this administration is leaning forward in a way that i think is professionally responsible and they are being advise
relations point for a osama bin on in the most famous terrorist of our age went so far to say that the media war is $0.94 of waging jihad the emphasis was not on the battlefield but on the perception he could foster among his enemies. the very fact media and public opinion has become so incredibly important put a great power the united states the specially a great democratic power at a disadvantage. said you look at what has changed and as part of the book we did a day debate -- a database that is included as the appendix and what we found the with rate has gone up prior to 1945 the insurgents when about 20 percent of the war's been since 1945 they went about 40% so that rate is roughly doubled. what accounts for that? i say the power of public opinion in the ability of relatively weak groups to bring down strother adversaries so that is something they try to do sometimes successfully. but there is a danger we should not swing too far and should not underestimate the power of guerrillas or overestimate them either they're not invincible. there is a tendency in the post-world war two era to f
the delay of the criminal trial for osama bin laden's son-in-law and former al-qaeda spokesman sulaiman abu ghaith. in delaware, the sequester has meant lengthy employee furloughs at the clerk's office of the bankruptcy court, resulting in reduced customer service hours and the postponement of it upgrades that would aid the efficient resolution of those important cases. the cuts have not been deeper only because that office is already working with 40% fewer staff despite an increasing caseload, including many time-intensive mega cases, which are so important for the country's recovery. the delaware federal public defender's office has had to furlough its defenders 15 days this year, essentially cancelling the criminal docket every friday for the rest of the year. every day the public defenders are furloughed is another day that defendants spend in pre-trial incarceration, at a cost to the taxpayer of more than $100 per day. the defender's office has also had to sharply curtail expenditures for investigators and experts, which may be leading to a decrease in the quality of representation, le
is exactly the same as it was pre9/11. it's exactly what osama bin laden said it was, and it's never changed. if you read their magazines, listen to their videos all their statements they point out. they sent their best bombmaker in the world to run part of their organization in algeria. it's the training ground to send fighters to different front all around the world. we have this sense we want to divide anything up and say today yemen is the most dangerous tomorrow algeria, then north africa. the fact is al qaeda's ideology is what's at the core. that's why they are called the base. the base is the uniting factor. that's where it comes electric. taking more terror and spreading ideology and that's that what's them more dangerous. >> good to see you. >>> a massive pipe explosion. it happened near erie. flames shot 300 feet in the air, could be seen for 80 miles. people forced out but most allowed back in this morning. crews shut off a natural gas line but flames expected to burn for several hours. no injuries reported. >>> former isn't of state hillary clinton is do
the global jihad foundation, obviously, shift more when osama bin laden took over and 9/11, but are we seeing now both disciples came together and sort of shared the same ideology? zawahiri, have we seen the shift towards a new approach to globallied had, or are we going to see -- global jihad? are we going to see more of cybersecurity issues, cyber wars that he's going to try and develop in al-qaeda, and now is it going to affect u.s. policy. >> want me? >> do you want to? >> yale, i'll go. we've -- yeah, i'll go. i think the big analytical mistake is to think that's not part of their global designs or doesn't assist them in waging global jihad. case in point in yemen, instituted a political platform under ansar al-sharia. and basically, this was there attempt to say that we can provide governance and basic services to you and that we can start, basically, you know, adopting parts of sort of, you know, the hezbollah or hamas model, we're going to ingrain ourselves in the committee and build up our own sort of governing model. the associated press recently came out with the head of the al-qae
people would say that president obama the very right to launch azeinab badawi race that killed osama bin laden. history and diplomacy co-exist. they interact with each other and they sometimes can complement each other. richard holbrooke, the late richard holbrooke, great american diplomat, i don't think he would have been able to secure the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian-serb army that we were not going to permit them to continue to kill innocent muslims. and it was that use of force that achieved the cease-fire and drove them to the negotiating table where holbrook worked his magic and brought peace to bosnia after five years of war. so there are times when we have to rely on our military and we're fortunate, as all of you know, to have extraordinary young men and women in our military and the army and the navy and the air force, marines and the coast guard and the national guard. [applause] and, like you, who just applauded, i admire the american military. they are absolutely critical to our security. one of the proudest moments of my
generally worked against al qaeda, osama bin laden being the most prominent example. other members of core al qaeda. and al qaeda-affiliated elements. >> there were three associated forces when you're in office. >> those were the three that i had the occasion to evaluate most often. here were other instances when i would conduct a legal evaluation where we did not go forward with a specific operation, but those are the three most prominent examples that we regularly briefed to congress. you referred to my oxford speech. i think we are at an inflection point as one journalist put it where we should no longer consider ourselves in a traditional armed conflict against al qaeda and affiliated groups. i think benghazi is a prominent example of what i am talking about. you cannot label the benghazi attacked as something conducted by al qaeda and associated forces. it was more of a mixed bag. in this period where we're head in addition new direction, we need to evaluate in congress what new authorities our counterterrorism professionals might need. and we're not just talking about drone strikes.
this or you are on the side of osama bin laden. but the media didn't expose this for really what it was at the time, and then you move on to the war in iraq, and, again, i -- i mean, i sound like a broken record, repeating some of the stuff that snowden is saying, but at the time, all of that talk about all of the lies we heard from the bush administration, it was the job at the people at that white house briefing to kick the tires and challenge the assertions, and get us the truth, and they never did. they never challenged weapons of mass destruction, to point out -- we didn't find out there weren't any until we invaded the country. >> yeah, it was too late. >> bill: everybody repeated this mushroom cloud crap from condy rice, as if it were true. and colin powell talked about this mobile missile launchers that they have -- he even had a drawing of them, that they could move ash the country, the whole thing. and didn't exist. and there were voices at the time, there were former un inspectors at the time, who were saying we haven't seen any evidence of weapons of mass destruction,
as it was pre-9/11. it's exactly what osama bin laden said it was. it's more of a change. if you read the magazine if you listen to the videos and all the statements that they point out, they sent their best bombmaker in the world to run part of their organization in algeria, because algeria was the training ground from which they sent their fighters from their different fronts from all over the world. we have this sense that we want to divide all of this to say yemen is the most dangerous area. tomorrow it's algeria, then north africa, and now syria. the fact is al qaeda's ideology is what's at the core. that's why they're called the base. the base is the uniting factor. and that's really where the threat comes from. they're taking more territory and spreading their ideology, and that's what makes them dangerous. >> lara logan, good to see you. thank you. >>> and a massive pipeline explosion this morning in illinois. it happened near erie. flames shot 300 feet in the air. they could be seen for 20 miles. people in 80 homes were forced out, but most are now aloud b
for the muslim brotherhood organization and he also stated that osama bin laden himself has been a member of the organization and he only left because of logistics issues egarding funding and embarrassment for the king if he is associated with bin laden. there are numerous evidences. we also have evidence the dissertation, written in the 1970's, he stated he was actually writing the theological foundations for al qaeda's organization. he is considered the spiritual leader of the brotherhood. here is numerous evidence, because the possibility of designating the muslim brotherhood as an international terrorist organization should definitely be out there. thank you. >> we love to have your opinions. >> well, this is a large topic area he is not the spiritual guide or leader for the muslim brotherhood. president morsi expressed his hope during a speech that they would be free, because that is a popular sentiment we have seen hroughout egypt. but that is not to dismiss the issue entirely. we should be careful about it. after 9/11, one of the first nanciers by al qaeda was designated by the bus
overreact -- i mean, osama bin laden was caught on tape saying he wanted to bleed america to the point of bankruptcy. and if 250,000 people take ciprol because there are tiny envelopes in washington, d.c., this is our own overreaction. it's self-destructive. >> homeland security and, again, i think the total budget's about $40 billion. if it had not been combined, maybe it would have been 32, 33 billion. so we're not talking about that large amount of money. in the overall picture, it has not been that draining. also you said where are bodies? well, if we hadn't stopped the london explosive plot, if we hadn't stopped the times square, the new york subway bombing, the -- actually, we got lucky in the michigan one, there's three or four thousand people right there, that's just three attacks i'm talking about, and there are any number of others that have been stopped. and again, i just wish the rest of the country used the nypd as the model because there's so much cooperation. if somebody does go to buy certain types of explosives, certain devices, that is told the nypd, and they can foll
rachel smolkin current deputy manager at "politico." stories ofrseen the the killing of osama bin laden come of the president's reelection campaign and you may know her from her great work with the politics team at usa today and the managing editor of the american journalism review. pendry andhel is jen who is not on your program. originally we were going to have an al jazeera reporter here but she has gone over to the mainstream and is now working for cnn, making her ineligible for the panel. agreed to step in and we appreciate that. she is the white house reporter for the huffington post and covers leadership on capitol hill. she joined huffington post a couple of years ago and spent years covering the legislative and executive wrenches of government for "rollcall." probably a walk in the park for her because she started covering the texas state legislature. again, stepping in for camille, so thank you for that. next to jen is john stanton who also has "rollcall" roots rate he is the chair of buzz feed here in washington. then smith, the editor described him as a reporter's reporter w
, is you have to knock out these people. president obama did it with osama bin laden who was not a leader of a nation, but a leader of the al qaeda movement. the united states did it with saddam hussein. one of the questions, and it is a difficult and collocated question, and i do not want to pretend this is a self-evident answer in terms of what to do, is if i thought is gone, what is an openm? that question. you have analysts on both side of the issue that argue on the key question, which is how strong are the relatively moderate rebel forces in syria? theypeople say because were not aided earlier, they are too weak now and there's not much hope that they could help others, like one of the strategys of the surge actually said that rebel forces that are relatively moderate are fairly strong and we could make a difference. david up next from north carolina. good morning. caller: actually, that is wilson, north carolina. i would like to thank you for being so moderate. your art to a great job interviewing him. it is still speculation that this has not used chemical weapons against his own
the pakistani physician who famously helped u.s. forces find osama bin laden and was promptly imprisoned by pakistani s. in the face of that, this administration sat idle and did nothing to get him sprung. there is an informal contract we make between the people who help us and other countries and the united states. we are in these two cases falling down and not upholding our end. it's shameful. >> meyer said it here on fox and says it in his new book, i couldn't have gotten out of this firefight without his help. he helped me carry guys out, he helped me save american lives. to turn our backs on them, he know where he's living. we know we could swoop in and get this guy out of there and help him and get him to the united states. why this visa is being slow walked is beyond me. >> it says that -- i'm reading this article now, they've signed off on the application, a general did, general dunford, then it was green lighted by the u.s. embassy in kabul and then the application was sent to the u.s. state department visa's department for vetting according to the person who wrote this article.
of the criminal trial for osama bin laden's son-in-law. in delaware, my home state, the sequester has meant lengthy employee furloughs at the clerk's office of our bankruptcy court resulting in the postponement of the infrastructure of i.t. infrastructure. the cuts have not been deeper only because that office is already working with 40% fewer staff despite ab increasing case -- an increasing case load. the delaware federal public defender's office has had to furlough its defenders 15 days this year so far, essentially canceling the criminal docket every friday for the rest of this year. every day is another day defendants spend in pretrial incarceration at cost to taxpayers of more than $100 a day. the defender's office has had to sharply curtail expenditures for experts which may be leading to a decrease in the quality of our representation leading to longer prison terms and more avoidable it taxpayer expense. and, frankly, the picture looking forward is still bleaker. next year the federal public defenders' office nationwide are scheduled to take a 23% budget cut. in delaware this means
, for a one word answer. do you believe that osama bin laden hid for five yearsçó in pakistan without anyone in the pakistani military intelligence knowing about it? >> no, i don't believe it. >> okay, then i'm going to ask you for a 10-word answer. ( laughter ). >> i don't think, now this is my opinion, i'm not backing this up with hard facts. i don't think general kiani knew that, i don't think there was a plan on where he was. but this was 700 meters from the gates of west point. now who know what is 700 meeters from the gates of our west point. but the reality is it was a very distinct come pound, it was like that funny house at the end of the street where people didn't act the same as everybody necessary the neighborhood, in an area why people are not naturally trusting. so somebody facilitated something. now, i sort of buy into the idea that the ambassador and i were talking, it probably was not official, but it could be someone who's got relationship with an official who is providing the help and there is a failure to ask questions that needed to be asked. there's a failure to due dil
. that is no longer the case. osama bin laden is no longer their plotting against the u.s. and our allies. it does not mean there is not a continuing threat posed by al not mean ithat does has not changed in its way of using force. there are other ways to work with the international community to reach objectives. the president took a trip to africa where he highlighted some of the strong relationships the united states has there. this is the work that the president vowed to do when he took office, which is to rebuild some of the relationships that were in tatters when this president entered the oval office. that strengthens the united states on the international scene. it is good for broader national security interests. but it is something that the president and members of his team have to work on something -- have to work on every day. >> more than 100,000 people have been killed. that is effectively like wiping out the entire city of south bend, indiana. how many more people need to die before the u.s. does employ some use of force beyond humanitarian aid? >> what the president does is he is eva
they were funded, where the training camps were. on 9/11 we did not know that. we knew osama bin laden was back, but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was get that intelligence and according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him --because he was ejected more than anybody else -- to enhanced integration techniques. this administration does not get it. they do not. obama made a speech here not too long ago to the national defense and basicallymay said ok, now we are returning back to the tree-9/11 days. we are not at war anymore. we are going back to pre-9/11. we will go try to round up the guys when they blow up. we are no longer on a war footing, if you will, in terms of thinking about the state we're in. i think that is dead wrong. totalan absolute misreading of where we find ourselves today. as i look at that part of the world am a north africa, a good part of the middle east, not just afghanistan, where they launched 9/11 from, but also yemen and the major struggle underway in egypt, the muslim there,hood taken power th
. we knew osama bin laden was in pakistan but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was to go get the intelligence. according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him, because he was subjected more than anybody else to enhanced interrogation techniques. why do i tell you all that history? this administration doesn't get it. they just don't and, obama made a speech here not too long ago. it was at the national defense university, maybe three months ago in may, and, basically said, okay, now we're returning back to the pre9/11 days, i.e., we're not at war anymore. we're going back to pre9/11, when it is just a law enforcement problem and we'll try to round up the bad guy when blows something up and we're no longer on a war footing, if you will in terms of thinking about the state we're in. i think that's dead wrong. i think it is an absolute total misreading where we find ourselves today. as i look at that part of the world, now, north africa, a good part of the middle east, not just afghanistan, where they launched 9/11 from but
and where that person is. if osama bin laden had been calling someone in the united states on their cell phone, i promise you it wasn't a stockbroker. we better know because these people are still plotting against us, and not if but when they strike again, the american people are going to turn to us and ask us, what has the federal government been doing to prevent this? we better have a good answer. because we live in a very dangerous world, one, by the way, where our enemies aren't just other countries anymore. our enemies are rogue states and their well-armed militias and radical clerics. this kind of danger calls for a clear strategic vision on foreign policy and this president sadly does not have one, which brings me to my third and primary concern about ms. power's nomination and it is one that is related to the united nations itself. we need an advocate in new york who makes it their primary focus to ensure that the united nations is more accountable, that it is more effective and that it efrbs u.s. interests and -- serves u.s. interests and is not a multilateral ideal in which we
would say that president obama had every right to launch the abbottabad raid that killed osama bin laden. history does demonstrate that its diplomacy coexist they interact with each other and they sometimes can complement each other. richard holbrooke the late richard holbrooke great american diplomat. i don't think he would you woule been able to secure the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian-serb army that we were not going to let them continue to kill innocent muslims. in fact the use of force achieved a cease of fire drove them to the negotiating table where holbrooke worked his magic and brought to peace to bosnia after five years of war. their times we have to rely on our military and we are fortunate as all of you know to have extraordinary young men and women in our military in the army navy air air force marines and the coast guard in the national guard. [applause] and like you who just applauded i admired the american military. they're absolutely critical to our security. one of the proudest moment of my career was when i served as
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)